Archive for engraving

Hereby presenting an excerpt from Punch, or the London Charivari magazine (July, 1869). It tells the story of today’s Free Friday Vintage Coloring Page.

“Imogen’s jewel-casket contains two or three handsome Bullas, one set with stones of lapis lazuli, one with rubies, and all with those charming devices in raised gold letters, AEI, PAX, LUX, VIS, &c., &c. Also an immensely thick and massive gold circlet for the throat, in exact imitation of the cord round the neck of the dying gladiator – Etruscan armlets and fibulae of every possible pattern and device, rings for every day in the wekk with the name of the appropriate god engraved on each (as Saturn for Saturday, &c.), and as for Greek daggers and Roman pins for the hair, they are innumerable!”

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Woman of Ornament - free Vintage Coloring page

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Hereby presenting an excerpt from A Book of the Country and Garden (1903) by H. M. Batson. It tells the story of today’s Free Friday Vintage Coloring Page which is an illustration by F. Carruthers Gould and A. C. Gould.

One of these was a mongrel fox-terrier named Joe, and so well did he understand all our conversation that when we did not wish him to know our plans we were forced to speak in Spanish, for he was quite good at elementary French. If we spoke English the matter was hopeless.

“Where are you driving to-day?”

“I am going to pay a call at Butterbridge.”

“Shall you take le petit chien?”

By saying “le petit chien” instead of “the dog” Jim would imagine that he was using all the necessary wiles of dissimulation.

“No, they don’t like dogs. I must leave him at home.”

An hour or so would go by, and our efforts to find Joe would become exasperating; so in despair I would start to find le petit chien waiting for me a mile away smiling by the roadside. He always smiled when he had got the better of me, but I only once heard him laugh aloud.

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Good Dog - a free Vintage Coloring Page

This image is given freely unto you for your personal use. Print, color, share, post (with a link back to www.vintagecoloring.com if you would be so kind) – any of those actions in isolation or combination. This image is not to be sold nor placed upon images that are sold. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

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